5 More Good Reasons

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Five more good reasons to stop the PPU plan for Urban Sprawl.
That adds up to 10 excellent reasons to let your city know we don’t want development in St. Anne de Bellevue.
Source: Springer.Com
From: Analysis of Urban Growth and Sprawl from Remote Sensing Data, Bhatta, Basudeb

6. Poor Air Quality
7. Increase in Temperature
8. Impacts on Water Quality and Quantity
9. Impacts on Public and Social Health
10. Other Impacts

6. Poor Air Quality

Sprawl is cited as a factor of air pollution (Stone 2008), since the car-dependent lifestyle imposed by sprawl leads to increases in fossil fuel consumption and emissions of greenhouse gases (Stoel 1999). Urban sprawl contributes to poorer air quality by encouraging more automobile use, thereby adding more air pollutants such as carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, ground-level ozone, sulphur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, volatile organic carbons, and microscopic particles (Frumkin 2002). These pollutants can inhibit plant growth, create smog and acid rain, contribute to global warming, and cause serious human health problems. Apparently it seems that low-density urban growth or sprawl can provide better environmental condition and fresh air, but Kahn and Schwartz (2008) found that urban air pollution progress despite sprawl.

7. Increase in Temperature

Positive correlation between land surface temperature and impervious surface clearly indicates temperature increase in the sprawled area (Weng et al. 2007;Wang 32 et al. 2003). On warm days, urban areas can be 6–8◦F (3.5–4.5◦C) warmer than surrounding areas, an effect known as an urban heat island (Frumkin 2002) (Fig. 2.8). The heat island effect is caused by two factors. First, dark surfaces such as roadways and rooftops efficiently absorb heat from sunlight and reradiate it as thermal infrared radiation; these surfaces can reach temperatures of 50–70◦F (28–39◦C) higher than surrounding air.

8. Impacts on Water Quality and Quantity

Sprawl also has serious impacts on water quality and quantity. With miles of roads, parking lots and houses having paved over the countryside, rainwater and snow melt are unable to soak into the ground and replenish the groundwater aquifers. Urban growth and sprawl lead to an increasing imperviousness, which in turn induces more total runoff volume. So urban areas located in flood-prone areas are exposed to increased flood hazard, including inundation and erosion (Jacquin et al. 2008). As new development continues in the periphery of the existing urban landscape, the public, the government, planners and insurance companies are more and more concerned by flooding disasters and increasing damages (Wisner et al. 2004; Jacquin et al. 2008).

9. Impacts on Public and Social Health

One of the original motivations for migration to the suburbs was access to nature. People generally prefer to live with trees, birds, and flowers; and these are more accessible in the suburbs than in denser urban areas. Moreover, contact with nature may offer benefits beyond the purely aesthetic; it may benefit both mental and physical health. In addition, the sense of escaping from the turmoil of urban life to the suburbs, the feeling of peaceful refuge, may be soothing and restorative to some people. In these respects, there may be health benefits to suburban lifestyles (Frumkin 2002). Sprawl is generally blamed for its negative impacts on public health (refer Frumkin 2002; Savitch 2003; Yanos 2007; Sturm and Cohen 2004).

10. Other Impacts

Sprawl also includes aesthetic impacts such as more ugly and monotonous suburban landscapes.